Evictions

How To Write A Eviction Notice

February 21, 2023

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One of the worst parts of any landlord’s job is evictions. 

They’re costly, time-consuming, and taxing on your mental health. 

However, they’re often a necessary part of the business. 

And every eviction will involve an eviction letter. 

This is the first formal step in the process. 

Thus, it’s important to understand how to write these letters because without them a legal eviction cannot occur. 

What is an Eviction Notice? 

An eviction notice is a letter to your tenant that serves as the initial step in the eviction process. The delivery of this letter lets your tenant know that they need to leave your property by a certain date. 

Furthermore, this letter is a record that you provided your tenant reasonable notice of the upcoming eviction. Keep a copy of the notice on file in case your tenant refuses to vacate the property and you need to pursue legal recourse. 

Each state has its own procedures related to serving notice, so it’s important to familiarize yourself with your state’s laws. 

What to Put in Your Eviction Notice 

It’s crucial to cover all the bases in an eviction notice. You want to protect yourself in every way possible. That said, here’s what you need to include in your letter: 

  • Addresses 
  • Current date 
  • Tenant names 
  • Status and date of the lease 
  • Explicitly stated reason(s) for the eviction 
  • Date that your tenant must leave the property 
  • Record for delivery of notice 

The letter’s date and the date to vacate are vital. It’s important to remember that each state has its own regulations. In Texas, for example, unless the lease agreement says something different, you must give your tenant at least three days to move out.  

Furthermore, the federal CARES Act requires landlords, in certain instances, to give tenants a 30-day eviction notice when the property is part of specific federal programs or if your property has a federally backed mortgage.  

Failure to follow local and federal laws can come back to bite you later, so make sure that the language in the letter is clear and the consequences are obvious if the tenant disregards the notice. 

Eviction Notice Types 

You can serve tenants eviction notices with cause or eviction notices without cause. Eviction notices with cause are necessary when your tenant violates the lease agreement. Eviction notices without cause are useful when your tenant hasn’t violated the lease agreement. 

Most landlords provide tenants with a warning notice before serving an eviction notice with cause. For instance, you can give your tenant a Late Rent Notice or Notice to Quit before you serve the formal eviction letter. These warning notices allow your tenant to “cure” the issue and avoid the eviction. 

That said, states typically don’t require landlords to give tenants a chance to fix the issues. You may serve an eviction notice right away in the instances below: 

  • Your tenant violates the lease agreement 
  • Your tenant doesn’t pay rent on time on multiple occasions 
  • Your tenant severely damages the property in some way 
  • Your tenant engages in illegal activity on the property 

Now, what about an eviction without cause? Most states require a 30-day or 60-day advance notice, but the typical range is anywhere from three to 60 days. 

As a note, landlords in states with rent-controlled property laws usually need a justifiable reason to terminate a lease agreement. However, if the lease isn’t a fixed-term lease you can ask the tenant to move out whenever you want. 

Eviction Notice Templates 

Now that we’ve discussed the key parts of formal eviction letters, let’s look at examples of eviction notice forms. You can use a free eviction notice form like the one below as a starting point for building your own. 

Template (With Cause) 

[Landlord’s Name/Property Management Company/Etc.] 

[Street Address] 

[City, State, Zip] 

[Phone number and email address] 

[Date] 

[Tenant’s name(s)] 
[Tenant Street Address] 
[Tenant Apartment Number] 
[City, State, Zip] 

Dear [Tenant First Name(s)] [Tenant Last Name(s)], 

A formal written warning was previously issued regarding [state reason for issuing eviction notice]. Your rental agreement signed on [lease date] clearly states in [section of lease containing the violated policy and precisely what was violated]. 

Due to the failure on your part to abide by the rental agreement and [cure or remedy] the aforementioned infraction, [Landlord’s Name/Property Management Company] has no choice but to submit this notice of eviction as of [date served]. 

You have [amount of time] to [state actions to be taken to avoid eviction if you will still allow it]. You have [set amount of days, at least the minimum required by law] to surrender possession of the premises located at [Property Address] to [Landlord’s Name/Property Management Company], or to the landlord’s authorized agent or attorney. 

Failure to comply will result in legal action, up to and including physical removal of all tenants from the property. 

If you have any questions surrounding this issue, please contact the rental office and ask for [Landlord’s Name/Landlord’s Representative]. 

Sincerely, 
[Your Name] 

Template (Without Cause) 

[Landlord’s Name/Property Management Company/Etc.] 

[Street Address] 

[City, State, Zip] 

[Phone number and email address] 

[Date] 

[Tenant’s name(s)] 
[Tenant Street Address] 
[Tenant Apartment Number] 
[City, State, Zip] 

Dear [Tenant First Name(s)] [Tenant Last Name(s)], 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that within [set amount of days, at least the minimum required by law] after service of this notice on [date served], you must surrender possession of the premises located at [Property Address] to [Landlord’s Name/Property Management Company], or to the landlord’s authorized agent or attorney. 

Failure to vacate the premises within [set amount of days] will result in legal action against you to recover possession of the premises, and to seek a judgment for damages for every day of occupancy after the expiration date of this notice, including but not limited to: treble damages, recoverable attorneys’ fees, and costs associated with any unlawful detention of the premises. 

This notice is intended as a [set amount of days] notice terminating your month-to-month tenancy. Prorated rent in the amount of [amount owed] is due as of [date] and payable through and including the date of termination of your tenancy under this notice.  

Sincerely, 
[Your Name] 

Conclusion 

With this road map and a couple of malleable templates, you have a foundation for a great eviction letter. Remember to review your local laws and consult with an attorney if you have any questions. 

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