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A State By State Breakdown Of Pet Deposit Laws

December 4, 2022

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Pet Deposit Laws By State

If you’re a landlord that allows pets, then you need to know pet deposit laws. 

Some states have different laws than others, so location may dictate how much you charge and how you charge the fee. 

And the last thing you want to do is run afoul of the law. 

In this article, we’re going to take a quick look at what you need to know about each state’s pet deposit rules. 

Alabama 

Landlords in Alabama may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Alaska 

Landlords in Alaska can charge a pet deposit for an animal. The pet deposit can be in addition to the standard security deposit and cannot be more than one month’s rent. 

Arizona 

Landlord in Arizona may choose to charge a pet deposit. If they charge one, the total deposit must not be greater than one and a half months’ rent. 

Arkansas 

Landlords in Arkansas may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

California 

Landlords in California can charge refundable pet deposits, but non-refundable pet fees aren’t allowed. However, the total deposit amount, including the pet deposit, can’t exceed two months of rent in total. This limit increases to three months’ rent for furnished properties. 

Colorado and Connecticut 

Landlords in Colorado and Connecticut may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Delaware 

Landlords in Delaware may ask for a pet deposit as long as it doesn’t exceed one months’ rent. 

District of Columbia 

Landlords in District of Columbia may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Florida 

Florida law doesn’t specifically address non-refundable fees. That being said, landlords in Florida may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Georgia 

Georgia law doesn’t specifically address non-refundable fees. That being said, landlords in Georgia may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Hawaii 

Landlords in Hawaii cannot charge non-refundable pet fees. Only the first months’ rent and security deposit can be collected. 

Idaho, Illionois, Indiana, and Iowa 

Landlords in Idaho, Illionois, Indiana, and Iowa may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Kansas 

Landlords in Kansas may ask for a pet deposit as long as it doesn’t exceed one half months’ rent. 

Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, and Missouri  

Landlords from all these states may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Montana 

Landlords from Montana cannot charge non-refundable pet fees. The pet deposit must be refunded unless there are legitimate deductions due to damages. 

Nebraska 

Landlords in Nebraska can charge a pet deposit as long as it doesn’t exceed a quarter of one month’s rent. 

Nevada 

Landlords in Nevada may ask for a pet deposit, which is usually between one to two months’ rent. 

New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, and New York 

Landlords from all these states may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

North Carolina 

Landlords in North Carolina can charge non-refundable pet fees and deposits, but they must be reasonable in amount. 

North Dakota 

Landlords can raise the security deposit to $2,500 or 2 months’ rent (whichever is larger) if a pet is present. 

Ohio and Oklahoma 

Landlords from all these states may ask for a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Oregon 

Landlords in Oregon can charge a non-refundable pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and South Carolina 

Landlords in these states can charge a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

South Dakota 

Landlords can charge a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Tennessee and Texas 

Landlords in these states can charge a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Utah 

Landlords in Utah can charge a non-refundable pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. It’s customary, though not required, that landlords disclose in writing if any part of the security deposit is non-refundable when a written agreement is used. 

Vermont and Virginia 

Landlords in these states can charge a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Washington 

Landlords in Washington can charge a non-refundable pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount and indicated in the lease as non-refundable. 

West Virginia and Wisconsin 

Landlords in these states can charge a pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. 

Wyoming 

Landlords in Washington can charge a non-refundable pet deposit as long as it’s reasonable in amount. However, the landlord must disclose in writing if any part of the deposit is non-refundable. The lease must also indicate this as well. 

Conclusion 

Most of these states don’t have statues regarding charging a pet deposit. Thus, it’s common for tenants and landlords to come to an agreement on their own. If there isn’t a limit specified by law, then a reasonable amount is typically understood as common practice. 

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